Zero Repeat Forever, G. S. Prendergast Book Review

Morning mortals! Today I’m excited to be reviewing one of my most anticipated books of 2017 Zero Repeat Forever. This book has a little bit of fairytale, a lot of science fiction and a lot of very interesting moments. How did it shape up?

Goodreads Summary:

He has no voice, or name, only a rank, Eighth. He doesn’t know the details of the mission, only the directives that hum in his mind.

Dart the humans. Leave them where they fall.

His job is to protect his Offside. Let her do the shooting.

Until a human kills her…

Sixteen year-old Raven is at summer camp when the terrifying armored Nahx invade, annihilating entire cities, taking control of the Earth. Isolated in the wilderness, Raven and her friends have only a fragment of instruction from the human resistance.

Shelter in place.

Which seems like good advice at first. Stay put. Await rescue. Raven doesn’t like feeling helpless but what choice does she have?

Then a Nahx kills her boyfriend.

Thrown together in a violent, unfamiliar world, Eighth and Raven should feel only hate and fear. But when Raven is injured, and Eighth deserts his unit, their survival depends on trusting each other…

This book is told from the perspective of both sides of the alien invasion. The human (Raven) struggling to survive and the Nahx (Eighth) struggling to reconcile a conscience he suddenly seems to possess. The result is a whole lot of angst, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but be warned there’s quite a lot of soul searching, if you’re looking for a straight up ‘kill the aliens and emerge triumphant’ you might be barking up the wrong tree.

What I enjoyed about reading this was how the author was so clearly trying to avoid the whole ‘Beauty and the Beast is just stockholm syndrome’ thing we all know and love. But with the plot she was going for it’s a hard thing to fight and there are times where that element of the story was a little off for me. I think that might be the issue with cramming too much plot into the first book in a series.

Having said that, what I appreciated was that this did not feel like the first book in a series. Until the last few chapters it didn’t feel like it was trying to set up some bigger plot it felt like a story in and of itself. In that sense it kind of reminded me of the Spellslinger novels which are designed to fit into themselves. So the amount of plot crammed in is perhaps a double edged sword. It limits what you can achieve but it also enhances the book in and of itself.

What this book truly has going for it are the moments of pure emotion that shine through. No spoilers but I can’t actually think ‘Zero Repeat Forever’ without getting a little misty eyed. If you’re looking for a book to help younger people (or to be honest older people) engage with the ethics of invasion and the mindset of soldiers this might be a good way to go about it.

I’m interested to see whether this series goes anywhere particularly interesting and will be keeping an ear out for what Prendergast is up to.

My rating: 5/5

By the way, I received a digital advanced review copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

What say you? Is this on your tbr? What did you think of the book? Let me know in the comments below!

J

3 thoughts on “Zero Repeat Forever, G. S. Prendergast Book Review

Add yours

  1. I definitely want to give this book a try now after reading your review! Although the plot seems a little too much, I hope the next books are worth it. Loved your review!

    Liked by 1 person

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